The phrase “Ink my whole body, I don’t give a mother fuck” is one that many teenagers and young adults identify with.

Before the year 2000, if you knew a person in your high school with a tattoo, it was probably someone that your parents didn’t want you hanging around. To further analyze the disparity, the “bad boy” “rebel” tattoo of the baby boomer generation was some sort of symbol on the bicep, or maybe some other strategic place. Those days that were a little more than a decade ago are a far cry from what today’s youth know and see. The contemporary urban fashionista and hip hop fanatic have taken a page from an outlaw motorcycle gang, covering their body from head to toe with tats, with no body part off limits.

Wiz Khalifa body art is imagery that represents today’s generation. Though the song Ink My Whole Body was recorded around 2008, it still remains a flagship song in his live performance, and it is something that reflects today’s society in 2012.




Not only is Wiz’s physical appearance a window into the youth of 2012, but also his content echo’s themes that adolescents can relate to, even so much that he did a themed album with Snoop Dogg that pinned the duo back in High School. Love it or hate it, Wiz Khalifa’s apathetic, smoked out, arrogance is the voice and personality that the youth listen to and emulate, and even in Wiz’s short lived success, you can see other artists that have followed in his trends and themes.

Wiz’s lyrical talent is arguable amongst many, but one thing that is undeniable is his selection of beats that he chooses to rhyme over. To his credit, he is excellent at picking instrumentals that compliment his voice, style and cadence, and many times, (not sure if he knows, doesn’t know, or knows and doesn’t care, any three can be the case) he will rhyme over a well crafted instrumental containing a sample from a legendary musician and/or group. In this instance, he paid homage to The Blackbyrds, the Donald Byrd produced group that churned out many classic albums in the 1970’s.

The song that Wiz Khalifa used as his “Tattoo Anthem” is entitled Mysterious Vibes from the album Action
The Blackbyrds – Mysterious Vibes

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Although this song has been sampled before (ParisDayz of Old to name another), it is Wiz Khalifa’s youthful exuberance that bridges the gap between today’s hip hop listener, and the smooth sounds of The Blackbyrds music, similar to what rapper Paris did for the early 90’s hip hop listener.


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